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pg. 14

John F. Kennedy realized that no political contest could be won by voice alone in the new age of television. Before his 1960 presidential debate with opponent Richard M. Nixon, the young Massachusetts Senator reached out to American film director Arthur Penn for coaching. The strategy paid off. During the debate Nixon looked awkward, while Kennedy exuded confidence and went on to win the election.

pg. 14

American automakers were taking a thumping from Japanese competitors in the 1980s until Chrysler Motors harnessed the power of film and the gritty zeal of executive Lee Ioccoca. in a series of hard hitting, to camera commercials Ioccoca resurrected the company’s failing image by looking straight into the camera and proclaiming “The pride is back!”

pg. 32

In 1939 when Britain faced war with Nazi Germany the fate of the Empire fell on the shoulders of a shy, stammering English monarch named George VI. To mobilize his subjects, King George worked with a speech therapist to hone a radio address heard around the world. While the King made a few stumbles, his courage to communicate authentically and from the heart exemplifies leadership under fire.

pg. 36

Being your best self on-camera is a key leadership asset. War hero and presidential candidate Senator John McCain knew this truth instinctively. During his 2008 campaign McCain earned the respect of all Americans when he defended rival Barack Obama from racial slurs made by supporters at a campaign stop in Minnesota.

pg. 37

Being prepared with key facts and figures shows your audience you are truly invested in your message and leadership abilities. In this video, Space X founder Elon Musk harnesses these qualities to a genuine excitement for his work-- while remaining composed and professional on camera.

pg. 41

Having the courage to be imperfect in front of an audience fascinates researcher and public speaker Brene’ Brown. During her TED talk, Brown sights the power of showing vulnerability on camera and how this quality that can bond the speaker to the audience in a positive human way.

pg. 80

In this TEDx appearance body language expert Mark Bowden makes the case that our brains are wired to make instinctive snap judgments about others based in part on a person’s non-verbal behavior. Facial expressions, eye contact and the physical gestures that leaders make on camera convey the true meaning of their message.

pg. 82

Virgin Group CEO Richard Branson personifies the power of a genuine smile and how it can patch up on-camera stumbles and affirms the validity of answers to tough questions. When his interviewer sites the criticism that Branson’s airline business contributes to global warming, he girds his straightforward answer with a smile from the heart.

pg. 87

Harvard Business School’s Amy Cuddy discusses the flip side of body language. In this talk she describes how using expansive arm movements and postures not only influences audiences in a positive way, these very same gestures can bolster the on camera confidence a leader feels while delivering his or her message.

pg. 107

Sharing personal stories on camera is a truly effective way make your message stick. That’s what Spanx founder Sara Blakely does so effectively in this video designed to give meaningful advice to new entrepreneurs. Blakely’s personal, anecdotal approach rewards the viewer with the feeling that they’re the only one in the room with her.

pg. 117

Microsoft’s new CEO Satya Nadella introduces himself to his highly dispersed workforce through a seamless, highly effective walk and talk with the company’s resident storyteller Steve Clayton. Clayton serves as both as the interviewer and proxy for employees. Nadella comes across as a genuinely focused and approachable leader. It’s brilliant.

pg. 129

Teleprompters are a mixed blessing as Will Ferrell’s character discovers in Anchorman: The legend of Ron Burgundy. When a news writer accidentally adds a question mark to Ron’s signoff he’s too busy reading to notice it. Takeaway: choosing you teleprompter operator with care could prevent this from happening to you.

pg. 130

Even the most seasoned performers struggle with the teleprompter. Look at the difference in J.K. Simmons’s on camera delivery in these two clips. After winning Best Supporting Actor at the Academy awards Simmons comments are authentic and touching sans teleprompter. A year later as an award presenter he’s forced to use a teleprompter and his delivery is stilted as reads his lines.

pg. 131

Even the most seasoned performers struggle with the teleprompter. Look at the difference in J.K. Simmons’s on camera delivery in these two clips. After winning Best Supporting Actor at the Academy awards Simmons comments are authentic and touching sans teleprompter. A year later as an award presenter he’s forced to use a teleprompter and his delivery is stilted as reads his lines.

pg. 148

In this video featuring YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki, the use of carefully selected b-roll and graphics to enhance a story is evident. Bright and focused, Wojcicki tells the story of taking her first computer class. Covering the many cuts in her interview are clips from her college days and graphics that evoke her rise at Google, and most of all her contagious enthusiasm for computer science.

pg. 164

Some leaders dread live interviews, but popular Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson seems to enjoy this one through some clever preparation. Tyson timed what he wanted to say carefully based on how long Stewart listened to other guests before interrupting them with quips. As a result the astrophysicist was able to plug his new book effectively.

pg. 169

Due to unfortunate information that has been brought to light since the book’s release, this clip featuring actor Kevin Spacey has been redacted.

pg. 197

Using the power of film to reach out to potential investors can work wonders when leaders take a person-to-person approach. In this crowd funder video, Adam Nimoy uses the Vulcan salute to connect to his audience as he proposes a documentary on his father Leonard Nimoy role as Spock. The ROI from Adams video far exceeded its goal of $600K.

pg. 198

Today most forward looking leaders make video a priority; it’s how they both connect convey their humanity and mission in a single stroke. A smiling Richard Branson encourages his employees to have fun while they challenge the status quo with new, innovative companies. SAS CEO Jim Goodnight uses video to inform his workforce about company benefits and programs that mitigate stress from their lives.

pg. 198

Today most forward looking leaders make video a priority; it’s how they both connect convey their humanity and mission in a single stroke. A smiling Richard Branson encourages his employees to have fun while they challenge the status quo with new, innovative companies. SAS CEO Jim Goodnight uses video to inform his workforce about company benefits and programs that mitigate stress from their lives.

pg. 203

In times of corporate crisis the, power of video to instill consumer confidence can’t be overestimated. When General Motors began a series of safety recalls in 2014 CEO Mary Barra’s looked viewers straight in the eye and promised the recalls were part GM’s overriding goal of doing what’s best for customers. GM is now recognized as one of the world’s best-run companies and Barra remains its CEO.

pg. 204

When it falls on a leader to apologize for a companies actions context is everything. When BP CEO Tony Hayward apologizes to a news reporter for his company’s cataclysmic oil spill in 2010 he lacks both intensity and authenticity. Then, abandoning all context Hayward complains that dealing the spill has put a dent in his personal life.